Raymond D Kelly, 19012003 (aged 102 years)

Name
Raymond D /Kelly/
Birth
Census
Census
Marriage
Occupation
1930 Aeronautical instrument engineer
Death of a wife
Note: Last residence: Menlo Park, San Mateo, California 94025
Death of a wife
Death of a father
Death of a mother
Death
Note: Zip code of last residence 94028
Burial
Note: Kelly plot
Family with parents
father
1871
Birth: about 1871Kentucky
Death:
mother
himself
19012003
Birth: February 15, 1901 30 25 Indiana
Death: September 29, 2003Portola Valley, San Mateo, California
younger sister
Private
younger brother
Private
younger sister
Private
Family with Enid Lillian McCaslin
himself
19012003
Birth: February 15, 1901 30 25 Indiana
Death: September 29, 2003Portola Valley, San Mateo, California
wife
18981976
Birth: October 25, 1898 30 28 Indiana
Death: April 25, 1976Santa Clara, California
daughter
Private
son
Private
Family with Elsie Wallin
himself
19012003
Birth: February 15, 1901 30 25 Indiana
Death: September 29, 2003Portola Valley, San Mateo, California
wife
19082000
Birth: about 1908Nebraska
Death: July 11, 2000Portola Valley, San Mateo, California
Marriage MarriageJanuary 22, 1975
Clarence H Miller + Elsie Wallin
wife’s husband
wife
19082000
Birth: about 1908Nebraska
Death: July 11, 2000Portola Valley, San Mateo, California
Marriage Marriage
Birth
Census
Census
Marriage
Source: S2889
Occupation
Name
Death
Source: Find a Grave
Death

Zip code of last residence 94028

Burial

Kelly plot

Shared note

In the 1910 US Federal Census for Madison, Morgan, Indiana, 39-year-old farmer Henry Kelly and his 34-year-old wife Douglas [Kate Douglas] have been married eleven years. They have had three children and all three are living with them, 9-year-old Raymond, 4-year-old Elma and 1-year-old Norman. Also in their household is their housekeeper, Cora Farmer (age not recorded). Henry owns his farm free and clear of mortgage. Raymond has attended school in the past year.

In the 1930 US Federal Census for Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, 29-year-old Indiana-born Raymond R D Kelly and his wife 31-year-old Indiana-born Enid M [McCaslin] Kelly have been married four years as he was 25 and she was 27 when they married. Raymond, Enid, their 2-year and 10-month old Ohio-born daughter, Joyce I Kelly and Enids mother, 61-year-old Ohio-born widow Effie [Kimble] McCaslin, are living in a rented house at 10528 Lauriston Avenue, for which they pay $50 a month. Raymond is an aeronautical instrument engineer, but had not worked on the preceding regularily scheduled work day. The family may have been living in Ohio in 1927 as Joyce is recorded as being born there. Everyone except baby Joyce can read, write and speak English. Enid has attended school in the past year. Raymond's parents were born in Indiana. Enid's father was born in Indiana and her mother in Ohio. Joyce's parent's were born in Indiana. Effie's parents were born in Ohio.

The Denver Post, 20 October 2003
A Colorado Life
Aviation engineer, 102, cataloged flight history
by Virginia Culver
Denver Post Staff Writer
Ray Kelly was devoted to airplanes and the airline industry, and probably would have been a pilot. but he had a blind spot in one eye and couldnt qualify.
So, Kelly, who died Sept. 29 in Portolin Valley, Calif., at age 102, spent his life as an airline engineer and had a career that spanned aviation from its beginings to the supersonic age.
He had the Depression Era work ethic and a professional demeanor most of his life, said his grandson, Alan Kelly of Hillsborough, Calif.
When he asked his grandfather what he wanted as an epitaph, Ray Kelly replied, That I was useful.
Ray Kelly was so intent on making flying better than he and other enfineers tried to come up with some way to get rid of fog on runways.
They tried using huge propane torches on an Oregon runway to burn off the fog. but fog cant be technically manhandled, Allan Kelly said, laughing.
Ray Kelly was interested in flying from the moment he boarded a barnstormer airplane that landed in an Indiana wheat field. He took an aerial photo of Franklin College, where he was a student.
His father, Harry Kelly, wasnt impressed with the whole idea of flying and certainly didnt think it was a good profession. Harry Kelly, who died in 1969, never went up in a plane.
Flying was condsidered unorthodox and not fully acceptable, because many worried about safety, said Ray Kellys son, Douglas Kelly of Derwood, Md.
Ray Kelly worked with Jimmy Doolittle in developing instrument flying, helped develop more sensitive altimeters and then worked with Boeing Air Transport in Cheyenne. It later merged with three other companies to form United Airlines.
He worked for UAL in Denver, Chicago and San Francisco.
He did a year-long study to help establish that larger passenger jets could outperform 50-sear propeller planed and smaller jets.
He earned several awards from the Flight Safety Foundation, the American Institute of Aeronautics and the Institute of Aerospace Sciences. He was inducted into the Aviation Hall of Fame in Dayton, Onio, in 1971.
He also shot scores of photos and movies, from the earliest mail planes to the Concorde. One of his films is in the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.
Raymond D. Kelly was born Feb. 15, 1901, in Lawrenceburg, Indiana.
He earned his michanical engineering degree from Purdue University in West Lafayette, Ind.
Kelly was married for 50 years to Enid McCaslin, whom he wed in 1925. In 1978, he married Elsie Miller. They were married 22 years. He survived both of them.
In addition to his son and grandson, he is survived by his daughter, Joyce Allen of Lacy, Wash,; 12 grandchildren; and 23 great-grandchildren.

From findagrave.com, contributed by Mark Wirey
Franklin Daily Journal 10 Oct 2003
PORTOLA VALLEY, Calif.
Raymond D. Kelly

Raymond D. Kelly, 102, died Sept. 29, 2003, in Portola Valley, Calif., where he was a resident.

He was born Feb. 15, 1901, in Lawrenceburg. His father was Henry Kelly. He was married to Enid (McCaslin) Kelly from 1925 to 1976 and to Elsie (Miller) Kelly from 1978 to 2000. Survivors include two sisters; two children; 12 grandchildren; and 23 great-grandchildren.

He attended Franklin College, where he was a member of Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity. He graduated from Purdue University in 1925 with a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering.

He worked as a civilian engineer with the Army Air Corps at McCook Field near Dayton, Ohio, from 1925 to 1928. There, he collaborated with Albert Hegenberger and James "Jimmy" Doolittle in tests and demonstrations of flying instruments. He was part of the development team that perfected the electrically heated Pitot tube. He met other famed aviators, including Orville Wright.

He worked in Los Angeles at The American Paulin System Co. through the Great Depression. In 1930, he began working as instrument shop foreman at Boeing Air Transport in Cheyenne, Wyo., which later merged with United Airlines. This began a 37-year career in commercial aviation that continued at United facilities in Chicago, Denver and San Francisco.

His "Paper Jet" study, conducted from 1952 to 1953, helped establish that larger passenger jets could economically out-perform the era's more popular 50-seat propliners and smaller jets. He completed his career at United in 1967 as director of technical development, based in San Francisco.

He worked part time into the early 1970s with the aviation consulting firm R. Dixon Speas Associates. His last projects focused on the development of prototype supersonic transports for aircraft makers Boeing and Lockheed.

In 1954, he received the Flight Safety Foundation Award by the Society of Automotive Engineers for helping establish the S-7 committee on flight deck and aircraft handling standards. In 1963, he was named as a fellow of both the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and the Institute of Aerospace Sciences. In 1971, he was inducted into the Aviation Hall of Fame in Dayton, Ohio. In 1977, he delivered the sixth annual AIAA/SAE William Littlewood Memorial Lecture.

A 45-minute compilation of his 8mm movies, "44 Years in Aviation, 1931 to 1975," is held in the archives of the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C., the Museum of Flight in Seattle and the Experimental Aircraft Association AirVenture Museum in Oshkosh, Wis. Video interviews are on file in the archives of the National Air and Space Museum and United Airlines.

A memorial service for family, friends and colleagues will be conducted Nov. 8 at Franklin College.

Memorial contributions may be made to the Raymond D. and Enid M. Kelly Student Travel Fund, Franklin College, 501 E. Monroe St., Franklin, IN 46131-2598.

Social Security Number issued in Illinois before 1951