Indiana McCaslins

Hiram StudleyAge: 50 years18241874

Name
Hiram Studley
Source: S228
Publication: Chapman Publishing Co., New York and Chicago, 1896
Source: S751
Publication: Town of Acworth, 1869
Birth May 3, 1824 36 38
Note: 1870 census gives Hirams birthplace as Connecticut, 1900 census gives Harriettes father, Hirams birth place as Vermont, but his marriage record gives it correctly as Acworth, Sullivan, New Hampshire.
Birth of a sisterEmily Studley
April 10, 1826 (Age 23 months)
Source: Find a Grave
Census 1830 (Age 5 years)
Census 1840 (Age 15 years)
Death of a fatherOliver Studley
May 17, 1851 (Age 27 years)
Source: Find a Grave
Note: Died of Dropsy
Burial of a fatherOliver Studley
after May 17, 1851 (Age 27 years)
Source: Find a Grave
Note: Middle Cemetery (Find A Grave Memorial# 68407163)
Death of a motherElisabeth Gould
October 2, 1853 (Age 29 years)
Note: Died of consumption, also given as 5 Oct 1853
Burial of a motherElisabeth Gould
after October 2, 1853 (Age 29 years)
Note: Middle Cemetery (Find A Grave Memorial# 68407164)
MarriageMary Abagail (Mary Abby) ChesleyView this family
January 5, 1854 (Age 29 years)
Note: Family records give the year as 1852
Birth of a daughter
#1
Ida Studley
January 12, 1855 (Age 30 years)

Note: Calculated from age at death
Death of a daughterIda Studley
August 2, 1856 (Age 32 years)
Burial of a daughterIda Studley
August 3, 1856 (Age 32 years)
Note: Burial in Green-wood Cemetery in Lot 3891
Birth of a daughter
#2
Harriette Barrett Studley
August 16, 1856 (Age 32 years)
Source: Find a Grave
Death of a wifeMary Abagail (Mary Abby) Chesley
September 10, 1856 (Age 32 years)
Note: Family records give 16 Aug 1856 as death date, which is the date of her daughter's birth. Death certificate says died of childbed fever almost a month later. Her first name is spelled Mary Abbie in the Massachusetts Vital Records, but Mary Abby in her obituary.
Burial of a wifeMary Abagail (Mary Abby) Chesley
September 13, 1856 (Age 32 years)
Note: Green-wood Cemetery, Lot 3891
Burial of a wifeMary Abagail (Mary Abby) Chesley
December 11, 1856 (Age 32 years)
Note: re-interred in Green-wood Cemetery, Lot 10207
Burial of a daughterIda Studley
December 11, 1856 (Age 32 years)
Note: Reburial in Green-wood Cemetery, Lot no. 10207
Death of a brotherWarren Studley
October 23, 1863 (Age 39 years)
Burial of a brotherWarren Studley
October 27, 1863 (Age 39 years)
Source: S34
Note: Green-wood Cemetery, Section 16, Lot No 10208
Occupation
One of the founders of the New York Transfer Company

Source: S228
Publication: Chapman Publishing Co., New York and Chicago, 1896
EMPL 1869 (Age 44 years)
Note: Express, 393 Fourth Ave
Census 1870 (Age 45 years)
Note: 1870 New York City census gives occupation as keeps livery stable,
Death June 13, 1874 (Age 50 years)
Burial June 17, 1874 (4 days after death)
Source: S34
Source: Find a Grave
Note: Green-wood Cemetery Plot: Lot 10207, Section 16 (Find A Grave Memorial# 58041588)
Religion
Presbyterian

Family with parents - View this family
father
mother
Marriage: September 15, 1811Lancaster, Worcester, Massachusetts
2 years
elder brother
21 months
elder sister
4 years
elder sister
3 years
elder sister
22 months
himself
23 months
younger sister
Family with Mary Abagail (Mary Abby) Chesley - View this family
himself
wife
Marriage: January 5, 1854Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts
1 year
daughter
19 months
daughter

Birth1870 US Census
Birth1900 US Federal Census
BirthMassachusetts Vital Records, 1841-1910
BirthNew Hampshire, Births and Christenings, 1714-1904
Census1830 US Federal Census
Census1840 US Federal Census
MarriageGenealogy of the Studleys
MarriageMassachusetts Vital Records, 1841-1910
OccupationS228
Publication: Chapman Publishing Co., New York and Chicago, 1896
EMPLNew York City Directory, 1869
Census1870 US Census
NameGenealogy of the Studleys
NameS228
Publication: Chapman Publishing Co., New York and Chicago, 1896
NameS751
Publication: Town of Acworth, 1869
DeathDeaths from the New York Post, 1801-1890
DeathNew York Times (1857-Current file)
DeathNew York Herald-Tribune
BurialS34
BurialFind a Grave
BurialNew York Herald-Tribune
BurialGREEN-WOOD (Cemetery), A National Historic Landmark
BurialGreen-wood Cemetery
Birth

1870 census gives Hirams birthplace as Connecticut, 1900 census gives Harriettes father, Hirams birth place as Vermont, but his marriage record gives it correctly as Acworth, Sullivan, New Hampshire.

Marriage

Family records give the year as 1852

EMPL

Express, 393 Fourth Ave

Census

1870 New York City census gives occupation as keeps livery stable,

Burial

Green-wood Cemetery Plot: Lot 10207, Section 16 (Find A Grave Memorial# 58041588)

Shared note

Hiram Studley was born 3 May 1824 in Acworth, Sullivan, New Hampshire to Oliver Studley and his wife Elizabeth [sic] [Gould]

In the 1830 US Acworth, New Hampshire census, Oliver Studley had the following: two males between 5 and 10 (Hiram is one of them), one male between 10 and 15, one male between 15 and 20, one male between 40 and 50 (himself), two females under 5 years of age, one female between 5 and 10, two females between 10 and 15, and one female between 40 and 50 (his wife, Elizabeth).

In the 1840 US Acworth, New Hampshire census, Oliver Studley had the following: two males between 15 and 20 (Hiram is one of them), one male between 50 and 60 (himself), two females between 10 and 15, one female between 15 and 20, one female between 50 and 60 (his wife, Elizabeth), and one female between 80 and 90 (who might be his mother-in-law, Elisabeth Goold, as his own mother is living in Groton with his sister).

About 1854, Warren Studley started an "express business" [UPS-like service] delivering parcels in New York city and invited his brother to become a partner.

From A History of the town of Industry, Maine: Mr. Studley, in company with his brother, Warren, first introduced the check system for railroads and steamers. Both Mr. and Mrs. Studley [Hiram's second wife-Elvira Storey Studley] were valued members of Dr. Crosbys Church.

On 5 Jan 1854, 27-year-old Hiram Studley married 25-year-old Mary Abby Chesley in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts. His residence at marriage was New York City and his business was "Express delivery". Her residence at marriage was Boston. Hiram was born in Ackworth, New Hampshire and Mary Abby in Durham, New Hampshire. His father's name is recorded as Oliver, but hers is not recorded. This was a first marriage for both of them and it was performed by Rev. Edward ? [his last name and affiliation are missing as the page edge has been torn].

Mary Abagail Chesley Studley died of childbed fever on 10 Sep 1856, about three weeks after the birth of her daughter, Harriette Barrett Studley. Hiram married Elvira Storey on 19 Mar 1857. Harriette did not realize that Elvira was her step-mother until Harriette was in her teens.

A case was heard inthe Supreme Circuit Court on 25 May 1859 before Judge Clerke, conserning the "Responsibility of Common Carriers". The plantif was Catherine Bissell, the defendent Hiram Studley, of Studley's City Express. Mrs. Bissell's action was to recover the value of a trunk and its contents allegedly lost by the defendent while transporting it from the New Haven Railroad Depot to the Hudson River Railroad Depot. Mr. Studley stated that the trunk was delivered to the baggagemaster of the Hudson River Railroad in the usual manner, and that ended their responsibility. He also contended that since part of the value of the trunk contents was the lady's jewelery, she could not recover for it as it legally is not considered "baggage". The trial took three days and the verdict was for Mrs. Bissell for the full amount, $386.25.

In February 1864, Hiram Studley is listed in the Alphabetical List of persons in Division No. 8 of the State of New York where he has an Express Business at 27th Street and 4th Avenue. The valuation of this business is $1,955 and his rate of taxation "2". His "Class A Ad Valorem Duty" is $39.10 which is the total amount of tax due. Hiram Studley also appears on the "Detailed Statement of unassessed Penalties collected in the Eighth Collection District of New York during the month of July 1864. His location is 116 E 30 [this is his residence], and his penalty is $3.10.

In the 1864 City Directory for New York, New York, Hiram and Warren Studley's business, H & W Studley Express, is listed as being at 282 Canal and at Fourth Ave at E 27th. It is also listed twice more on the same page; once as Studley Hiram express, and once as Studley Warren express. Hiram's home address is 116 E 30th and Warren's home address is 69 E 27th. Warren died in October a year earlier. Apparently the directory information was acquired before his death.

Classifed ad in the New York Times, December 6, 1863: HORSES AND CARRIAGES.


Three or Four Small Express wagons ; also a large two-horse wagon in perfect running order, for sale. Apply at STUDLEY'S Express Office, corner 27th -st. and 4th-av.

In the 1865 City Directory for New York, New York, Hiram's business is listed as Studley Hiram, express at E 27th at Fourth Ave and 282 Canal. His home address is 16 E. 30th.

In the 1866 City Directory for New York, New York, Hiram's business, Studley & Co Express, is listed as 282 Canal and at Fourth Ave at E 27th. Hiram also has a listing on the same page as Studley Hiram, express, with the addresses as 282 Canal and E 27th at Fourth Ave. His home is listed as 116 E 30th.

Lost and Found notice from The Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, New York), November 12, 1866, page 9 $25 REWARD--FOR A DOUBLE black BAG, pocket on outside; had Dodd's ex- press label check 368, 93 Jornlenon [?] street; supposed to have been lost off wagon. The above reward will be paid and no questions asked by returning it to D. P. HOWELL, agent Studley's express, 166 Montague street, Brooklyn.

In the 1867 City Directory for New York, New York, Hiram's business, Studley & Co Express, is listed at Fourth Ave at E 27th. Hiram also has a listing as Studley Hiram, express, with the addresses as E 27th at Fourth Ave and 142 Grand. His home is listed as 116 E 30th.

In the 1868 City Directory for New York, New York, Hiram is listed as Studley Hiram, express, with the addresses as E 27th at Fourth Ave. His home is listed as 116 E 30th.

In the 1870 US Federal Census for New York, New York, New York, 46-year-old Connecticut-born [sic] Hiram Studley is recorded as 'Keeping a livery stable". He is an over 21 years old white male citizen of the US. He and his 40-year-old Maine-born second wife Elvira [Shorey] Studley (keeping house) have in their household, Hiram's daughter by his first wife Mary Abbie Chesley Studley, 14-year-old New York-born [sic] Hattie [Harriette], and their two New York-born children 12-year-old George and 8-year-old Ella. All three children have attended school in the past year. Also in Hiram and Elvira's household are 43-year-old New York-born railroad conductor Chas [Charles] Hamon, 40-year-old Connecticut-born Hanah [sic] Hamon, 39-year-old New York-born Ida Burton, 37-year-old Lucina Burton, 40-year-old Irish domestic servant Bridy Murphy and 39-year-old Irish domestic servant Rose Murphy.

In the 1870 City Directory for New York, New York, Hiram has only a business listing as Studley, Hiram, express at 393 Fourth Ave.

In the 1872 City Directory for New York, New York, Hiram has both a personal and a business listing. His business is now listed as Studley & Co Stables at 393 Fourth Avenue. His personal listing is as Studley Hiram, stables, 393 Fourth Ave, home 1166 E 30th.

In the 1873 City Directory for New York, New York, Hiram's home address is listed as 116 E 30th. Studley & Co is listed five lines lower, still at 393 Fourth Ave, but it is now identified as a stable and Hiram's brother-in-law L.M. Shoray [sic, this is Lyman Munson Shorey] is listed as proprietor.

In the 1874 City Directory for New York, New York, Hiram's home address is listed as 116 E 30th. No listing is given for a business.

Hiram Studley died on 13 Jun 1874, as recorded in the New York Times, New York Post and New York Herald Tribune.

Obituary - New York Times 14 Jun 1874 STUDLEY.-On Saturday, June 13, 1874, at his late residence, No. 116 East 30th st., Hiram Studley, of Studleys Express, aged 50 Years. Notice of funeral hereafter.

Obituary - New York Herald-Tribune, 16 Jun 1874, page 4 "HIRAM STUDLEY The funeral of Hiram Studley, the well-known expressman, will take place at 5 o'clock this evening at his late residence, No. 115 East Thirtieth-st. [sic] During his life he was considered a very useful man. About 26 years ago a brother, Warren Studley, started the first baggage express of this city in Manhattan-alley. [sic] The speculation proving a good one, he induced his brother to come on from Boston, and together they started Studley's Express at No. 37 (now 276) Canal-st. [sic]), near Broadway. About 12 years ago the brothers received the exclusive privilege of conveying the baggage of the passengers by the New Haven and Harlem Railroads. About eight years ago Warren Studley died, and his brother was not able to carry on the business successfully. In less than a year he sold out to Mr. Dodd, who continued the business under the old name. After having been employed as superintendent for about two years, Mr. Studley entered into partnership with L. M. Shorey, his brother-in-law and opened a livery stable in Fourth-ave [sic], between Twenty-seventh and Twenty-eighth-sts.[sic] About two years ago he retired from business, and has since remained unemployed. He was very determined in disposition, and although at one time an inveterate smoker, he suddely gave up the habit and never resumed it. In 1866 he became a member of the Fourth-ave. [sic] Presbyterian Church, and was soon elected a trustee, occupying that position during the erection of the new chapel attached to the church. When the New York Transfer Company was started Mr. Studley was the first man to carry a passenger across the city in a transfer coach-an undertaking that was attended with great peril in consequence of the opposition of the hack-drivers. He was much respected as a Republican politician in the Twenty-first Ward, where he resided, and was offered in the last election the nomination of Alderman, but refused it. About two weeks ago he was taken sick with erysipelas and died on Saturday evening."

[Erysipelas is an acute streptococcus bacterial infection of the skin, which before antibiotics, frequently spread to other parts of the body through the blood stream, causing septic arthritis, infective endocarditis (infection of the heart valves) and septic shock.]

Editorial Notes-New York Evangelist, 18 Jun 1874 "Many will share our sorrow at seeing announced the sudden death of Mr. Hiram Studley of this city,so long known to the public as the man who first introduced the system of baggage express, and who was at the head of it for many years. Such was his personal popularity, that the company which succeeded to the business which he had founded and organized, still clung to his name, and succeeded in the good will and confidence of the public as being Studley's Express. But what we most like to remember now, is the modest yet sterling worth of the man. Though in a business which brought him in contact with a rough and rude class of men, he was himself a true Christian both by profession and in his life. He was a member of Dr. Crosby's church, and one of the trustees, and was highly esteemed both by pastor and people. Many who have for years seen his kindly face, will learn of his death with sincere regret, and with deep sympathy for his excellent family."

Fifty-year, one-month, eleven-day-old, New Hampshire-born Hiram Studley died of erysipelas at his residence, 116 East 30th Street, New York on 13 Jun 1874. He was buried in Green-wood Cemetery in Lot 10207 on 17 Jun 1874.

According to Portrait and Biographical Record of Suffolk County (Long Island) New York, Hiram first worked for the Adams Express company and later founded the New York Transfer Company, which at the time of his death in 1874 had the contract for all railroad and steamboat business along the Hudson River. This company also had contracts to carry mail between the depot and the post office as well as a customs house contract. Note that the information in the obituaries does not quite match the bit of puffery (above) contributed to a vanity press publication by his son, George Barrett Studley, about 15 years after his fathers death.