Indiana McCaslins

Virginia Joyce FullerAge: 72 years18941967

Name
Virginia Joyce Fuller
Married name
Virginia Joyce DePrez
Birth April 3, 1894
Census 1920 (Age 25 years)
Birth of a daughter
#1
Suzanne DePrez
May 27, 1923 (Age 29 years)
Death of a husbandDaniel Wray DePrez
February 26, 1967 (on the date of death)
Death February 26, 1967 (Age 72 years)
Family with Daniel Wray DePrez - View this family
husband
herself
daughter
Private
daughter
Private
daughter

BirthSocial Security Death Index
Census1920 US Federal Census
DeathSocial Security Death Index
DeathCalifornia Death Index
Shared note

Name found on her daughter Suzanne DePrez's application for a Social Security number.

Thirty-one year old D Wray DePrez married 21-year-old Virginia J Fuller on 1 Sep 1915 in Shelby County, Indiana.

In the 1920 US Federal Census for Shelbyville, Shelby, Indiana, 35-year-old Indiana-born Wray [sic] and hs 25-year-old Indiana-born wife Virginia [Fuller] DePrez have in their household their Indiana-born children 3-year-old Virginia F and 2-year-old Patricia. Also in this household is 22-year-old Indiana-born Florence Keppel who is recorded as a daughter [sic - this is not possible due to the ages of the purported parents]. All the adults are litereate and can speak English. Wray is the owner of a hardware store. Florence is a maid in a private family. Wray's father was born in Ohio and his mother in Indiana. Virginia's parents were born in Indiana, as were the parents of Virginia F and Patricia. Florence's parents were also born in Indiana.

Virginia [Fuller] DePrez, born 3 Apr 1894, died 26 Feb 1967 in Riverside County, California. Her mother's maiden name is recorded as Parrish on the California Death Index. Her last residence was listed as Shelbyville, Shelby, Indiana 46176 by the Social Security Administration. She had applied for her Social Security number in Indiana ibefore 1951.

Daniel and Virginia [Fuller] DePrez died on the same day, 27 Feb 1967 in Riverside County, California, even though their last address of record is Shelbyville, Shelby, Indiana 46176.

The Shelbyville News

Frebruary 27, 1967

PROMINENT CITY COUPLE

VICTIMS OF AUTO CRASH

Gen. DePrez and Wife

Die in California

Two of Shelby county's most prominent and widely known residents are dead today, victims of a highway crash in California in which their granddaughter was also injured. The crash victims are Brig. Gen. D. Wray DePrez, 82, and his wife Virginia, 72, 103 West Mechanic Street. The granddaughter, Miss Brooke Scott, daughter of William O. Scott, of this city, is in the surgical section of General Hospital Riverside, California. She received probable fractured ribs and her condition was officially listed as "not critical." Gen. DePrez was president and the son of the founder of the J. G. DePrez Co. here, retired commander of the 76th Infantry Brigade of the 38th Division, Indiana National Guard, and prominent in business, industry, banking, and farming activities. Mrs. DePrez had been a member of the Shelby County Welfare Board for many years. Gen. and Mrs. DePrez were killed, probably instantly, when a small foreign car driven by the granddaughter was in collision with a Jeep at an intersection near Riverside, where the local couple arrived Saturday for a visit. The accident occurred at 2:20 p.m. (PST) Sunday. The local couple was pronounced dead on arrival at a nearby March Air Force Base hospital, where Miss Scott also was treated and examined before removal to the General Hospital. Gen. DePrez died of chest and internal injuries. Mrs. DePrez suffered skull and internal injuries. Mr. and Mrs. William O. Scott, son-in-law and daughter of Gen. and Mrs. DePrez and parents of the injured young women, left by plane this morning for Riverside. Definite funeral arrangements have not been made pending word from the Scotts but tentative plans call for the customary calling hours followed by private rites at the Ewing Mortuary here later this week. Following cremation, public interment rites also will be held at Forest Hill Cemetery early next week. Full military honors at the graveside also are planned for the retired general. In accordance with earlier expressed wishes of both Gen. and Mrs. DePrez it was requested flowers be omitted. The local couple left here Thursday by train for a visit with the granddaughter, who is a school teacher at Riverside, and were to have visited a grandson, DePrez Ewing, a lieutenant in the U.S. Air Force at Lubboc, Texas, this week. Gen. DePrez' interests extended into almost every facet of community life here and his long military career also gave him a wide acquaintance throughout Indiana and the rest of the country. He was president of the State Armory Board at the time of his death, and had been a board member of that board for nearly 40 years, and also served 10 years as a trustee of the Indiana World War Memorial at Indianapolis. His military career began in 1915 when he joined the old Indiana State Militia as an enlisted man and in the intervening half-century he held virtually every rank to that of brigadier general to which he was appointed by Gov. Harry G. Leslie in 1932. He became a captain in 1917 in Co. 1 of the Ind. Regiment a major in 1917 and a colonel in 1921 and was commander of the 151st infantry Regiment. With his appointment as brigadier-general he became commander of the 76th Brigade, 38th Division, Indiana National Guard, in which he served until World War II when in 1942, he was named assistant executive officer of Camp Wolters training center in Texas. Later in the war he served with Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Forces (SHAEF), based in London as members of the joint British-American military government section charged with the responsibility of planning and restoration of electrical power on the European continent following the invasion. He retired from the army in 1944, having reached the statutory age of retirement. He was a graduate of Culver Military Academy in 1904 and attended Butler and Chicago Universities. He also served many years as a member of the Board of Officers of the Culver Legion. In 1953, he received the Indiana Distinguished Service Medal for his long service in military affairs. In the business world he was president of the DePrez hardware firm here, vice-president of the DePrez-Scott hardware stores in Franklin and Rushville and a former president of the Indiana Retail Hardware Association. He was a director of the Farmers National Bank and helped organize the Chambers Corporation here and also the Sta-Titie Snath Co., manufacturers of scythe handles, of which he was a former president. He was also a director of the Indiana Manufacturers Association. He was a former member of the Board of Education of Shelbyville schools and a charter member and former president of the local Rotary Club, which he headed in 1939-40. He held extensive farm interests and was head of Turkey Trap Farms in the county. He was a member of and a reader in First Church of Christ Scientist, which both he and Mrs. DePrez attended. In the fraternal field he was a member of the Masonic order, Knights Templar, 32nd degree of the Scottish Rite at Indianapolis, Murat Shrine Temple at Indianapolis, Elks, Eagles, American Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars, the Indianapolis Press Club, Columbia Club of Indianapolis and the Farm Bureau. Besides serving as a member of the Shelby County Welfare Board for many years, Mrs. DePrez was a member of the Wi-Hub Circle, Order of Eastern Star, a former Gray Lady and a former member of the Indiana State Symphony Association. She was the daughter of William W. and Minnie (Parrish) Fuller and was born here April 3, 1894. She attended Shelbyville High School and Hollins College in Virginia. Her husband was the son of Jacob G. and Jennie L. (Wray) DePrez and also was born in Shelbyville, on June 29, 1884. The couple was married September 1, 1915. They were the parents of three daughters, Mrs. William O. Scott, Mrs. Richard Ewing, and Mrs. Arthur Thurston and there are nine grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Mrs. DePrez is also survived by a brother Parrish Fuller. Summarized by Phyllis Miller Fleming