Indiana McCaslins

George Wasson KingAge: 86 years17821868

Name
George Wasson King
Birth January 5, 1782
Source: S5322
Note: Given as Wytheville, Wythe, Virginia, but neither existed when George was born.
Death of a fatherJohn? King
before April 21, 1787 (Age 5 years)
Note: Family Bible Records of Johnson County, Indiana give his death date as 1792, which cannot be correct as Margaret is recorded as a widow on 21 Apr 1787 in the tax list for Montgomery County, Indiana.
MarriageEleanor VoorhiesView this family
April 21, 1803 (Age 21 years)
Source: S5322
Birth of a daughter
#1
Jane Vanarsdall King
April 6, 1804 (Age 22 years)
Source: S5322
Birth of a son
#2
George Wasson King
August 29, 1806 (Age 24 years)
Source: Find a Grave
Death of a half-brotherRichard McCaslin
before November 13, 1806 (Age 24 years)
Note: His wife Elizabeth Wilson McCaslin with David McCaslin, signed inventory as "true bill"
Birth of a daughter
#3
Elizabeth King
November 22, 1808 (Age 26 years)
Source: Find a Grave
Birth of a daughter
#4
Charlotte King
November 15, 1811 (Age 29 years)

Source: Find a Grave
Birth of a daughter
#5
Cyntha Ann (Cynthia) King
October 21, 1814 (Age 32 years)
Birth of a son
#6
John Calvin King
July 2, 1817 (Age 35 years)
Birth of a daughter
#7
Mary Covert King
May 2, 1820 (Age 38 years)
Marriage of a childDavid Wason McCaslinJane Vanarsdall KingView this family
January 7, 1822 (Age 40 years)
Marriage of a childRobert GilchristElizabeth KingView this family
August 5, 1824 (Age 42 years)

Death of a half-brotherRobert McCaslin
before 1830 (Age 47 years)

Census 1830 (Age 47 years)
Marriage of a childGeorge Wasson KingKatherine HerriottView this family
before 1831 (Age 48 years)

Death of a wifeEleanor Voorhies
April 8, 1831 (Age 49 years)
Source: Find a Grave
Source: S5322
Burial of a wifeEleanor Voorhies
after April 8, 1831 (Age 49 years)
Source: Find a Grave
Note: Pioneer Cemetery (Find A Grave Memorial# 28521325)
MarriageElizabeth Doss Watson (Wasson?)View this family
January 8, 1832 (Age 50 years)

Marriage of a childJames ShafferCyntha Ann (Cynthia) KingView this family
November 8, 1832 (Age 50 years)
Death of a sonGeorge Wasson King
August 5, 1833 (Age 51 years)
Source: Find a Grave
Burial of a sonGeorge Wasson King
after August 5, 1833 (Age 51 years)
Source: Find a Grave
Note: Pioneer Park Cemetery (Find A Grave Memorial# 28521302)
Marriage of a childCornelius HuttonJane Vanarsdall KingView this family
December 3, 1833 (Age 51 years)
Source: S2865
Publication: The First Presbyterian Church of Franklin, Indiana (1946)
Marriage of a childSamuel W RitcheyMary Covert KingView this family
August 2, 1836 (Age 54 years)
Marriage of a childJohn Calvin KingElizabeth MontfoortView this family
October 24, 1837 (Age 55 years)
Marriage of a childWilliam McCaslinCyntha Ann (Cynthia) KingView this family
November 21, 1839 (Age 57 years)
Note: William McCaslin and Cynthia Ann King are children of half-brothers, David McCaslin and George King.
Census 1840 (Age 57 years)
Death of a daughterCharlotte King
May 17, 1843 (Age 61 years)

Source: Find a Grave
Burial of a daughterCharlotte King
after May 17, 1843 (Age 61 years)
Source: Find a Grave
Note: Pioneer Park Cemetery
Death of a half-brotherDavid Wasson McCaslin
December 17, 1850 (Age 68 years)
Publication: Brant & Fuller (Chicago, Illinois 1888)
Burial of a half-brotherDavid Wasson McCaslin
after December 17, 1850 (Age 68 years)
Note: McCaslin Cemetery; Findagrave Memorial # 31624145
Census 1850 (Age 67 years)
Death of a daughterJane Vanarsdall King
April 16, 1855 (Age 73 years)
Source: S5322
Source: Find a Grave
Note: Death date also given as 22 Apr 1855 in Riley Tullis' SAR application
Death of a half-brotherJohn McCaslin
1855 (Age 72 years)

Note: He is not on the 1860 census although his wife Sarah is still living with the McCleareys
Burial of a daughterJane Vanarsdall King
April 22, 1855 (Age 73 years)
Source: Find a Grave
Note: Date on tombstone, Welsh Cemetery (Find A Grave Memorial# 84781891)
Census 1860 (Age 77 years)
Occupation
1850 Farmer
yes

Death June 26, 1868 (Age 86 years)
Source: S5322
Burial after June 26, 1868
Source: Find a Grave
Note: Greenlawn Cemetery-tombstone states that he was 86 years and 5 months old when he died. (Find A Grave Memorial# 16225165)
Family with parents - View this family
father
mother
Marriage: before 1781
1 year
elder sister
1 year
himself
Mother’s family with Richard McCaslin - View this family
step-father
mother
Marriage: before 1765
1 year
half-brother
3 years
half-brother
2 years
half-brother
1 year
half-brother
3 years
half-sister
Family with Eleanor Voorhies - View this family
himself
wife
Marriage: April 21, 1803Kentucky
1 year
daughter
2 years
son
2 years
daughter
3 years
daughter
3 years
daughter
3 years
son
3 years
daughter
Family with Elizabeth Doss Watson (Wasson?) - View this family
himself
wife
Marriage: January 8, 1832
Caleb Shelledy (Shillideay) + Elizabeth Doss Watson (Wasson?) - View this family
wife’s husband
wife
Marriage: January 8, 1808, Shelby, Kentucky
22 months
step-daughter
2 years
step-daughter
step-son
step-daughter

Birth
Given as Wytheville, Wythe, Virginia, but neither existed when George was born.
Burial
Greenlawn Cemetery-tombstone states that he was 86 years and 5 months old when he died. (Find A Grave Memorial# 16225165)
Shared note
From Johnson County Family Bible Records, Vol 2: "George King was born in Wythe county, Virginia [sic Wythe county didn't exist in 1782]. When he was 12 years old, his family moved to Mercer county, Kentucky. His mother, a widow, married a McCaslin for her second husband [she married McCaslin first, then King as indicated by the ages of the McCaslin and King children and by the information in the Ritchie-Shelledy book authored and compiled by Mary Evelyn Ritchie, where she mentions that Margaret King signs the consent for her son David Wasson McCaslin]. In 1822, King with his wife and children came to Johnson county Indiana in what is now the city of Franklin. He was a charter member of the Franklin Presbyterian Church, and his son, Rev. John Calvin King, married Elizabeth Monfoort, daughter of Rev. David Monfoort, first regular pastor of that church. Eleanor Voorhies King, first wife of George King, is buried in Pioneer Cemetery at Franklin, but George King is buried in Greenlawn Cemetery , Franklin, Ind." Transcribed by Lois Johnson From the "History of Johnson County Indiana, by D.D. Banta: "In October, 1S20, George King, Simon Covert, Samuel and Cornelius Demarer, Peter A. Banta, William Porter, James and Wallace Shannon and Prettyman Burton, all of whom were residents of Henry and Shelby counties in Kentucky, made a tour of parts of Indiana, to "look at the country." Crossing the Ohio, a few miles below Madison, they traveled eastwardly through Jefferson and Switzerland counties, thence to Versailles, in Ripley, and through Napoleon and on to the "Forks of Flat Rock." Shortly after crossing the Ohio, William Hendricks joined them, but at the "Forks" he turned aside to become the proprietor of the count}' seat of Decatur Count}-. King and his company kept on till the}' reached Connor's Prairie, where they took the back track on the Indian trail till they came to the location of the seat of government, where "four little cabins" were all there was of the future city. Crossing the White River at that place, they visited Eagle Creek and then White Cieek, after which they re-crossed the river at Whetzel's. Riding up to the Bluffs, they followed Whetzel's trace out to the Indian trail, where they saw Loper's unfinished cabin, and thence they traveled southward past the Big Spring and Berry's ford, and so on to their homes, having been absent seventeen days. The following fall. King and Covert, who were brothers-in-law, and William Shannon, a neighbor, returning to the state, made another journey to examine the country. This time they went direct to Indianapolis, passing through Johnson County, and attended the first sale of lots in that new city. Crossing White River the same day, they rode to the neighborhood of Eagle Creek where they camped. The next morning they set out in earnest for the Wabash country and saw but one cabin from Tuesday morning till the following Sunday evening. The journey was a disappointment to them. The country was not apparently as good as they had been led to expect. " Good land was like the milk sick, still ahead." They returned to their homes by the way of the Vermilion River country. After another year, King and Covert made a third trip to the state. This time they were accompanied by Garrett C. Bergen, and the purpose of their journey seems to have been to enter lands in Johnson County. King, who was the leader in all these expeditions, was of the age of forty years. His native place was Wythe County, in Virginia, whence he had moved with a widowed mother to Kentucky while a lad. where he had been apprenticed to a wheelwright with whom he had learned the trade. He had the knack of money getting, and having accumulated a small sum, he was desirous of settling himself in a new country at such a place as he would be enabled to control the location of a county town, on lands he might himself own. On this third visit he saw his opportunity. On the 8th of January, 1S21, an act had been passed organizing Bartholomew County, and on the 31st of December following, bills to incorporate Morgan, Marion and Shelby counties had been approved bv the Governor, leaving the territory lying between, to be incorporated thereafter. The situation was patent to every one, but King seems to have been the only one who was able to take advantage of it. On reaching the Blue River settlement he fell in with Samuel Herriott, whom he questioned concerning a suitable town site in the neighborhood of the center of the unorganized territory, and from him learned of what was supposed to be a suitable tract lying in the angle formed bv the confluence of Lick and Camp creeks. The land lookers went at once to it, and after looking the land over and each selecting his tract, they rode off to Brookville to make their entries. But when there they learned that the unexpected thing had happened. Twenty-two days before, Daniel Pritchard had entered the very eighty that King had marked as his own. But George King was not the man, when once he had put his hand to the plough, to look back. He purchased the eighty adjoining the Pritchard tract on the west, while Bergen bought on the north and Covert on the east, as they had originally intended, after which they returned to the neighborhood of their purchases, and King finding the owner of the coveted eighty, paid him two hundred dollars for his bargain and took a conveyance in fee. Covert and Bergen returned to their homes but King remained. Securing names to a petition to the Legislature, praying for the organization of the territory lying between Morgan and Shelby into a county, he went by the way of Corydon, then the capital of the State, and procured the passage of an act organizing the new county, which receiving the signature of the Governor, became a law on the 31st of December, 1S22, and the county was named Johnson, in memory of John Johnson, one of the Judges of the Supreme Court of the State." In the 1830 US Federal Census for Franklin, Johnson, Indiana, George has in his household one male 10-15 years old (his son John Calvin) one male 40-50 years old (himself), one female 10-15 years old (Mary Covert), one female 15-20 years old (Cynthia Ann) and one female between 50-60 (his wife, Eleanor) In the 1840 US Federal for unidentified township, Johnson, Indiana, George King has in his household one male between 5 and 10, one male between 10 and 15, one male between 50 and 60 (himself), one female between 15 and 20 and one female betwee 50 and 60 (his second wife, Elizabeth Doss Watson Shelleday King). His farmstead is next to that of his nephew Harvey [Hervey] McCaslin, son of George's half brother, David Wasson McCaslin. None of the children listed are from his first marriage to Eleanor Voorhies (ages are wrong as they are too old to match the categories) so they are probably Elizabeth's grandchildren from her first marriage to Mr. Shelledy. In the 1850 US Federal Census for Franklin, Johnson, Indiana, George is a wealthy 67 year old farmer as his net worth is $17,000. In his household are his 61-year-old second wife Elizabeth Doss Shellady King, James McCaslin (age 23 and a farm laborer),and Mary Steele (age 12). James McCaslin is Newton McCaslin's son so George King is his uncle, and James married both of George's granddaughters by George's daughter, Jane King McCaslin Hutton, Esther Shellady McCaslin and Sarah Jane Hutton. Shellady is a varient spellling of Shillideay/Shelledy. In the 1860 US Federal Census for Franklin, Johnson, Indiana, George is a very wealthy 77 year old farmer as he owns $23,5000 worth of real estate and has $24,155 worth of personal property. In his household are his 71-year-old second wife Elizabeth (Watson) Shellady King, 21-year-old servant Hugh Mequiston, and Elizabeth's granddaughter 9-year-old Mary F Doss, child of her "deceased daughter, Cynthia Doss". Will Transcript Book 2 pp 282-6 Dated 26 July 1864 Recorded 7 July 1868 Wife Elizabeth Son John C King and his son David Daughters Cynthia-the wife of William McCaslin, Jane dec., Elizabeth-the wife of Robert Gilcrees, Mary the wife of Samuel Ritchey Grandsons George W. King, George Gilcrees-the son of Eli Gilcrees Jane the widow of John Legan-relationship not stated George the son of Robert Gilcrees (a grandson?)[he is a grandson] Ann Coon-now living with us Eleanor the daughter of Cornelius Hutton-relationship not stated [Granddaughter - Jane King McCaslin's daughter by her second marriage to Cornelius Hutton] Cornelius W, Mary E, and Martha J McCaslin grandchildren of my daughter Jane dec. Almanda (present name not known [Brooks]) late widow of my grandchild George McCaslin dec. Trustees of Hanover College American Tract Society American Bible Society Several codicils to the will were made revoking legacies already made before his death. Robert L Bone is mentioned as occupying George's farm near Franklin. He wants good tombstones placed over family graves in the Old Franklin Graveyard and a good stone fence aroun his lot in the new Franklin Graveyard, with proper tombstones. Almanda listed as Almanda Brooks in one of the codicils. Executors His son John C and John P Banta, by a codicil, he changes them to William M McCaslin and J P Banta Witnesses A B Hunter and R T Overstreet. George W King obituary Johnson County Free Press, Franklin, Indiana Thursday, July 2, 1868 Died at his residence in Franklin, on Friday evening, the 26th ult. at 6 P.M. George King, in the 86th year of his age. ANOTHER PIONEER GONE. George King, the Founder of Franklin. In another column may be read the announcement of the death of George King. Owing to his close connection with the early history of Johnson county and the town of Franklin, the occasion demands something more than a mere obituary notice, and we will from such records and memoranda as we have in out possession attempt such a sketch of his life and times as may be of interest to our readers. George King was born on the 5th day of January, 1782, in Wythe county, Virginia, [sic] and was consequently in his 86th year when he died, five years older than the Constitution of his country. In 1792, his father having died, he was one of the company of 473 persons that emigrated from Virginia to the "dark and Bloody ground". He settled at or near Harrod's station, now Harrodsburg, in Mercer county, Kentucky, where he remained until 1798, when he removed to Shelby county, where he served an apprenticeship to a wheelwright. In 1801 he returned to Mercer county, and two years after married Eleanor Voris. In 1811 removed to Henry county [Kentucky] where he remained until the fall of 1823, when he removed his family to Franklin. Up to 1818 the Deleware [sic] Indians held possession of all the territory in this state, watered by the White River and its numerous branches. In that year Gov. Jennings, General Cass and Benjamin Park, Commissioners appointed by President Monroe, purchased the Deleware's [sic] title, and soon after a land office was opened at Brookville and these lands thrown into the market. Early in the spring of 1820 the first settlements were made in this country. Joseph Bishop and John Campbell came into the Blue river bottom, by way of the Indiana trails from the south, and Abraham Sells and Thomas Lowe came from the White Water country along the Whetzells Trace. In the fall of 1822, George King accompanied by Simon Covert and Garrett C Bergen, both of whom are still living, came to the present [sic] site of Franklin. They found that Daniel Pritchard had entered the eighty acre tract located within the "forks" of Hurricane and Youngs creek. King entered the eighty west of Pritchard's and on which west Franklin is built, and bought Pritchard's tract at an advance of two hundred dollars on the original cost. Bergen bought on the north and Covert on the east. At that time Levi Moore was living in a cabin near the crossing of the Hopewell gravel road and Young's creek, he having come from the settlements to the south by way of the Indian path which led from Blue river across to were Hopewell Church now stands. At this time there were perhaps thirty or forty voters living within the territory now known as Johnson county, and one hundred and fifty to two hundred souls, certainly no more. The citizens being anxious for a county government, Mr. King took it upon himself the duty of procuring an act of the Legislature organizing a county. He accordingly attended the legislative session held at Corydon that winter, and after experiencing all the trails and hardships peculiar to the business he was engaged in, an act was passed and received Governor Hendricks's signature on the 31 of December, 1822 organizing Johnson county. A full narrative of the matter would occupy too much of our space and we accordingly pass it over without further narration. Returning to his family in Kentucky, George King made immediate preparation for moving to his new purchase and in the month of March, 1823, with Simon Covert and David W. McCaslin, these two last with their families and Isaac Voris, a young unmarried man, they cam to this place, cutting a road for their teams from the house of Elisha Adams near Amity, to the lands they had bought. King's cabin was first built near where the brewery is, in West Franklin, Covert's next near the Hurricane. The next fall Mr. King's family came out. On the first Monday in May of that year the Commissioners appointed for the "purpose of fixing the permanent seat of Justice" met at the house of John Smiley and two localities were submitted to them as proper places for locating the town, one near the mouth of Sugar Creek on the lands of Amos Durbin and the other on the lands of Mr. King, who donated to the county fifty one acres for County purposes. He continued for sometime to reside in the cabin first built and erected a shop in the place where he worked at his trade. The second and third courts held in the county were held in his shop. For a time he engaged in the Mercantile business and was for fourteen years postmaster. He was always however, more or less engaged in Agricultural pursuits and by close attention to business and through the rise of property, he accumulated a handsome fortune. He was a member of the Presbyterian church sixty-three years, and ruling elder from 1824 to 1857, when at his own request, on account of his age, and political intolerance of some of his eclesiastical brethern [sic], he was excused from further duty on the session. His first wife having died, he was married the second time in 1832 to Mrs. Elizabeth Shallady [sic] who survives him. On last Sunday afternoon a large congregation of our citizens met at the Presbyterian Church where the Rev. A.B. Morey preached his funeral from Genesis 2, 8. After which his remains were escorted to their last resting place, "Earth to earth and dust to dust". Let his errors, for what mortal hath them not be written in the sands of the sea beneath the ebbing tides, and his virtues engraved n brass. And let the young men of this fair and lovely county of Johnson treasure the memory of those hardy men who came in the "olden time" and who spent their days of prime in conquering the wilderness that it might bloom for the good of those now living. Transcribed by Lois Johnson